Recruiters: Improve Your Email Writing With These 8 Tips

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Anyone who works now must get to grips with email writing, and this is especially true for those in recruitment. A good email can make or break a potential hire, so it’s essential that you get it right. Here’s eight tips that will help you write the best email, every time.

1. Make good use of subject lines

The subject line is the first thing the recipient is going to see, so make it count. The best way to write a subject is to make it specific, so they know that they need to open your email. Writing ‘Job interview 2pm Thursday’ is better than just writing ‘Job interview’.

2. Improve your grammar

This seems like a no brainer, but you’d be amazed by how many emails are ignored everyday due to poor grammar. It can make you look unprofessional and sloppy, something you don’t want. If you feel yours needs improving, try contacting a writing community such as Paper Fellows or Assignment Help to get you back on track.

3. Keep emails short

You don’t want your email to overstay it’s welcome. The best emails are those that are short and to the point. Make your most important point in the first sentence of the email, and use the rest of your writing to clarify it.

4. Don’t overuse email

Email is a helpful tool, but it’s not the best one to use every time you need to communicate. For example, if you need to have a back and forth conversation, you’ll need to call or use IM instead. Make sure you’re using the right tool for the job.

5. Personalize your emails

If you’re sending several emails out at once, avoid using the ‘Sir/Madam’ greeting. Nothing will get an email deleted faster. Instead, personalise your emails and show that you’re paying attention to the people you’re contacting.

6. Be positive

This isn’t too hard if you’re getting to tell someone they got the job. Always be positive in what you’re writing. Even if you’re writing with bad news, frame it as good feedback for the reader’s next job interview.

7. Be polite

Emails are somewhat less formal than letters, but politeness still goes a long way. Your recipients will have other obligations, so if you’re requesting something of them, make sure you’re asking nicely when you do so.

8. Proofread

Every email should be proofread before you send it. If you can, ask someone else to check it first. It’s very easy to miss mistakes because you’ve spent so much time with your own writing.

Helpful email writing tools

There’s plenty of tools out there that will help you get the most out of your emails. Here’s some of the best ones to try out:

  • Easy Word Count: This tool will check spelling for you, and give you an accurate word count.
  • Boom Essays: This site offers highly useful courses on business writing.
  • Cite It In: This site gives you the correct citation for any source you use in your writing.
  • Custom Essay: The expert writers at this service can proofread important emails for you.
  • Enchanting Marketing Blog Headlines: This guide gives you useful advice on writing attention grabbing headlines and subject lines.
  • UK Writings: The writers at this service can help you draft those all important email campaigns.

It’s not hard to craft the best email, every time you sit down to write one. With good emails you can increase your hiring rate, and bring in even better talent. It’s well worth spending the time to improve your writing.

About the author

Mary Walton works as online editor and proofreader at Academized. She enjoys visiting business conferences around the world, and applies her knowledge at business consulting. Mary helps people with resume writing at Resumention. Read Mary’s recent post on her blog: UK Writings review.

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