Healthcare Recruitment Trends in 2016 [Infographic]

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It is a good time to be healthcare professional. Our 2016 Healthcare Recruitment Trends in 2016 & Beyond infographic below shows this industry is in the midst of some serious growth, both for job seekers, employers, and just about every else along the hiring chain in the healthcare industry. While there may a lot of positions opening, employers can have some serious challenges facing them when trying to find qualified applicants. RealMatch examines just this issue:

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View from 30,000 feet

  •  $13.4 Billion (with a B!) will be spent on healthcare sector recruitment advertisements in 2016.
  • There are currently 478,284 healthcare related job openings.
  • On average, jobs are posted online for 50 days. There are 19 candidates per job opening.
  • There are 12,230,000 healthcare professionals in the qualified talent pool available for healthcare related positions.
  • The list of current top job titles includes:
    • Registered Nurse (2,687,310)
    • Licensed Practical Nurse (695,610)
    • Pharmacy Technician (368,760)
    • Pharmacist (290,780)
    • Physical Therapist (200,670)
    • Speech Language Pathologist (126,500)
    • Nurse Practitioner (122,050)
    • Occupational Therapist (110,520)
    • Physician Assistant (91,670)

By Geography

  • The top paying states and the annual mean wage for healthcare jobs are:
    • $91,240 in California
    • $87,630 in Hawaii
    • $87,600 in Oregon
    • $86,830 in Alaska
    • $86,440 in New Jersey
  • The states with the highest healthcare employment positions are:
    • California – 730,270
    • Texas – 574,980
    • New York – 502, 290
    • Florida – 465,460
    • Pennsylvania – 357,690

Healthcare Employment Growth

  • Healthcare is projected to be the fastest growing industry within the service-providing division from 2012-2022, with a 2.6% per year growth rate.
  • Employment is projected to grow by 29% by 2022, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • This is 2X faster than overall projected employment growth.
  • By 2022, the healthcare industry is expected to be the largest employer, overtaking state and local government by number of jobs.
  • 64% of healthcare professionals surveyed plan to seek out a new job within the next year and 40% within the next 3 months alone.

Projected Numeric Growth

These are the most popular job title with the largest expected increase in employment by 2022:

  • Personal Care Aids – 581,000 new jobs
  • Registered Nurses – 527,000 new jobs
  • Home Health Aides – 424,000 new jobs
  • Nursing Assistants – 312,000 new jobs
  • Licensed Practical & Licensed Vocational Nurses – 183,000 new jobs
  • Medical Assistants – 163,000 new jobs
  • Physical Therapists – 74,000 new jobs
  • Dental Assistants – 74,000 new jobs
  • Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians – 71,000 new jobs
  • Pharmacy Technicians – 71,000 new jobs

The New Role of Social Media

  • The use of social media for job searching in the healthcare industry has nearly doubled in the last 5 years.
  • 60% of healthcare professionals enhanced their social profile in the past year.
  • 42% of healthcare professionals actively engage in social media for job searching purposes.
  • 40% of healthcare professionals use social media to research a company.
  • 43% of healthcare professionals use social media to contact peers at a hiring company as an effective way to learn about new opportunities
  • 31%of healthcare professionals use social media for professional networking.
  • 20% of healthcare professionals use social media to reach a recruiter.
  • 10% of healthcare professionals use social media to reach out to the HR department.

Looks like the healthcare sector is set to keep growing. But will there be enough qualified candidates for all the available jobs?

Want to learn more about how RealMatch can help? Request a demo right now!

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Yoav Guttman

Yoav B. Guttman loves email, A/B testing, data and lots of other marketing buzzwords. He loves traveling, music, and seeing art, but especially creating quality, albeit humorous, advice for job seekers on the web series Quote The Raven (#quotetheraven). Follow him on Twitter @whybegee or LinkedIn.

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About Yoav Guttman

Yoav B. Guttman loves email, A/B testing, data and lots of other marketing buzzwords. He loves traveling, music, and seeing art, but especially creating quality, albeit humorous, advice for job seekers on the web series Quote The Raven (#quotetheraven). Follow him on Twitter @whybegee or LinkedIn.

6 Thoughts on “Healthcare Recruitment Trends in 2016 [Infographic]

  1. Hello,

    I am currently doing research on healthcare industry, and more specifically on medical billing and coding jobs. How do you think job trends will fair out for medical coders and medical billers. I understand that as a whole the healthcare industry is growing. However, I hear more and more anecdotes of people saying that even after becoming certified, they can’t find jobs in medical billing or medical coding.
    One of the most common things I hear is that while searching for entry level positions, the employers are looking for people with experience. However, you need to get a job to get experience. This contradictory hiring policy for medical billing and medical coding makes me think that although there are more and more medical billers and coders becoming certified, there aren’t as many jobs in the market.

    I look forward to hearing your response.

    Sincerely,
    Jay Patterson – http://www.medicalbillingandcodingsite.com

    • Yoav Guttman on April 26, 2016 at 11:10 am said:

      Sent this to a colleague of mine who is more of an expert on this stuff and this was his response:

      Educational companies are selling education and certifications to make profit, so they are heavily marketing that angle as education/certification is a must and needed. In many cases, companies can hire and promote someone within and train them and not have to worry about hiring the certification.

      Good classic example of where the certification should be obtained while you are in the job, and not in the sense to get the job. Education/training does not guarantee placement.

      Would need to see the supply/demand of those with the certification and without to know if there is a surplus of those with the certification vs. the open jobs for the skill set desired. A great example to this is the PMI certification. Project Management Professional. Very hard certification to obtain, and you should easily make over 110k with it… however many companies will hire someone without the certification and pay them 70k-80k because it impacts the bottom line. Ultimately, your experience in my opinions trumps education, this is not to say education/training is a bad thing, it is not…unfortunately, companies do not usually invest in their people, and try to save on new hires as it’s a gamble…why pay more when you can pay less…? It sucks actually…

      My first job after college was working for an online degree/certification program and know how cutthroat the sales can be for certification and training, it’s very profitable…

  2. We work with a lot of organizations that have hit a wall trying to hire nurses and healthcare professionals through online means. They have success expanding their marketing plan with geo-targeted direct mail pieces that go to just the qualified candidates within commuting distance of their facility. It really makes a difference.

    • Yoav Guttman on September 9, 2016 at 1:39 pm said:

      Yes – marrying the online and offline experience is a surefire way to increase interest in whatever it is one might be selling. Here’s the thing though – with the direct mail, you might be limiting yourself too much and missing the best potential hires, whether because they are passive or because they are willing to be, let’s say, a travel nurse.

  3. Kathren Mack on September 14, 2016 at 2:16 pm said:

    Hi Yoav,

    Question for you- do you know how many Recruitment firms there are in the US that are working specifically in the healthcare industry? I’m just looking to get a rough number for some research I’m doing. This infographic was super helpful!

    • Yoav Guttman on September 14, 2016 at 3:01 pm said:

      Hmmm…that is a good question. I do not know have that data anywhere, but you have to remember that includes one-man-band headhunters, travel nursing companies, and healthcare specific placement firms and staffing companies – so very broad depending what you consider a healthcare recruitment firm.

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